408. The Garden We Share | Author Zoe Tucker | Brighton, England

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The Garden We Share

The Garden We Share

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Transcript

COMPUTER GENERATED UNEDITED TRANSCRIPT:

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6m 12s

Zoë Tucker

Hi, thank you so much, Jackie. It's so nice to be with you today and congratulations on seven years. That was amazing. That was absolutely fantastic.

6m 24s

JackieMarie Beyer

I know when there's still listeners, there's more listeners than their word when I started Hanging in there. Well, my show is a success completely because of my amazing guests like you. So I guess I should add like, is it Zoë and not Zoe?

6m 40s

Zoë Tucker

It's Zoë actually. Yeah. Zoë Tucker. That's fine. I go by both. It's absolutely fine.

6m 48s

JackieMarie Beyer

Where are you? Are you on the other side of the world or I'm in Northwest Montana work.

6m 55s

Zoë Tucker

Oh, wow. You're sounds brilliant. I'm in England. I'm in Brighton on the south coast of England. I'm currently sitting in my two up two down Victorian terrace house, which becomes very important in our conversation later.

7m 11s

JackieMarie Beyer

Oh my gosh. I was actually just looking at like hostels and apartments and please stay in one day because this friend of mine is there right now. And I was like, how fun would it be to go visit? But I don't know. Like some of the places were saying like, you had to have proof of like emergency travel. Like you couldn't go. So I don't know if one didn't under that. And there's so many amazing gardeners that I interviewed last year in that like, I'm dying to go see Charles. Oh my gosh, I'm going to get a blank on his last name right now. It's not Darwin Charles. Anyway, how far is brightened from one?

7m 48s

Zoë Tucker

So it's about, I don't know it in miles, but all I do know is it's about an hour, an hour and 15 minutes on the train and with directly south. So it's a really popular place to live if you work in London, which is kind of how I came to be here and lived in London for probably about seven or eight years after college. And then yeah, decided London, London is great, but I wanted to be by the sea. I grew up by the sea and I wanted to get back to being on the coast. So this was the perfect spot for me. So I've been here just about 18 years now and I definitely call it my home. It's a really, it's a really fun city to be in because it's quite a creative Bohemian city with, there's always lots of stuff going on and lots of creative things to get involved in.

8m 37s

Zoë Tucker

So it really works for me.

8m 40s

JackieMarie Beyer

Oh goodness. Do you guys get snow there ever?

8m 44s

Zoë Tucker

Occasionally, but very, very rarely. I mean, because we're so close to the coast, not so much, but we have had a couple of good snow days. It's definitely not like you do. Do you know, I grew up, I spent three and a half, four years when I was very small in New Hampshire. And I remember the snow when I was a kid in New Hampshire and it was, you know, is there three, four months of the year ice skating on the driveway and being in a snowsuit a lot of the time it was great. We don't get snow like that.

9m 16s

JackieMarie Beyer

So I always do start off the show asking about your very first garden experience. Like who were you with when you grow? Like, what do you remember? Was it

9m 26s

Zoë Tucker

So, yeah. Do you know what I was thinking about this? Like my first garden experience? It's definitely, I would definitely associate it with my dad. He's a very keen gardener. And in fact, I found this book that I did at kindergarten in New Hampshire. And I drew a picture of my dad in the garden and he's, he's still into it now. He has a much smaller garden. He's retired and he lives by the river. So we obviously a water family, but he has a small garden, but he still takes a really keen interest. So I think my first experience of gardening would be with him. I wouldn't say you're going to love this. I don't have a garden because I live in the city currently, but he's always made it so that I have pots, little pots of flowers and things to grow.

10m 17s

Zoë Tucker

Even when I lived in London, I had this tiny balcony off my flats of the kitchen and he just came along and put two or three planters down and put some beautiful nasturtiums in there. So they trailed out over the, go over the balcony. And I never managed to look after as well as my dad, but he definitely tries for me.

10m 42s

JackieMarie Beyer

Ah, that's inspiring. I think to a lot of my listeners, you know, your publicist said you wanted to talk about urban garden. Like, is that what you wanted to talk about? Or was there something else that you want to talk about? Like community guard? Well, tell us about your book.

10m 57s

Zoë Tucker

Okay. So I've written the book, the God and reshared, and I, this book is really, really close to my heart. Like just, I suppose I should tell you how it came about. My friend Marie invited me to go to a seed swap. Do you have those in America?

11m 16s

JackieMarie Beyer

We do. Of course, they've all been virtual for the last couple of years because of the pandemic, but no, we have an awesome one here in Montana and I've met so many great friends. I think

11m 26s

Zoë Tucker

Never, I never went to one before. And like I said, I don't, I don't have a garden, but my friend Marie has a small garden and she said, come with me. And it just sounded like a really nice day out. So off we went and I have to say it was just brilliant. It was such an amazing community vibe, everything, essentially the seats walk is free. There was a small donation if you didn't have anything to swap. But I came home with a handful of these tiny brown envelopes and each envelope with saved or wrapped by the gardener that had saved the seeds. And I had some cut and grow lettuce, various different types of heritage tomatoes.

12m 9s

Zoë Tucker

OB-GYNs cadets, which I think you cause the kidneys and some flowers, but I don't have a garden. So that really kind of prompted me to go and get some pots for our front step. So I mentioned to you that we're in a Victorian terrorist house and we, so the only bit of outside space we have is the front path and the steps up to the door. And so I put all the pots down the side of the steps and I honestly, I honestly didn't think anything would grow, but my friend Marie, she was like, just give it a go. See what happens. You might be surprised. And it was brilliant. And two that spring and summer, you know, within a few weeks, as you know, you start to see the shoots and things start to grow.

12m 56s

Zoë Tucker

And through the summer we, my husband and I would enjoy assisting on the front step. We have a very sunny aspect and we would, in the evening we would sit with a beer on the front step and we'd look at these pots at the same time. My brother-in-law was very, very ill. And we, I think there was such a comfort for us at that time sitting together, we would talk about Matt, but we would also look at the flowers and look at the way everything kept growing. And I was really struck by that kind of connection with nature.

13m 37s

Zoë Tucker

The fact that life, it was kind of a mirrored. Our life like life keeps growing nature prevails, and it gave us a bit of joy and a bit of hope at a really dark time through our grief. And those were the two threads that prompted me to write the garden we share. And on the back of the book, it has a quote that says the seeds I hold in my hand, remind me of your garden. Each one grown with can filled with love. And I remember those lines came to me immediately. There, there was, there were first things I wrote about the story. And so, yeah, that's kind of where the idea came from. It's a reflection of life and community and hope, and there is a grief and how we can keep the memory of our loved ones alive within what we do every day with our loved ones.

14m 31s

JackieMarie Beyer

Well, listeners are going to be crying. That's a great thing for children too, because I am an elementary school teacher by trade. And you know, you always have kids in your classroom who have lost a parent or have a relative who's in the hospital or is ill or who is going through that. And to have a book that you can read to them is just priceless.

14m 54s

Zoë Tucker

Yeah. And I w I mean, it's a tricky subject to, to write about, but I hope that within it, I hope within the book, there's an opportunity for parents to open up some of those conversations that are quite difficult. And I hope that it comes from a point of optimism about ways in which, you know, you've built a community around you and you share your knowledge, your experience, your love, and that goes with gardening or making something, whether it's cooking or it's saving your seeds. But it also goes with that life experience of losing somebody as well.

15m 32s

JackieMarie Beyer

Do you want to tell us about some of the characters that, that occur in the book?

15m 36s

Zoë Tucker

Yeah, sure. So it's written from the perspective of the little girl she arrives at the garden and it's really it's her grandma or an older figure. We, when I wrote the book I gained, I really wrote it from the heart. So I wasn't really picturing what the end result would be in illustrations, but the illustrations were very much, it shows were very much in a community garden, in an urban setting. And the little girl is with three older ladies. And I love these ladies, Jackie, because they are, they're just super cool. I don't know if you've seen them in the pictures. They're just really aspirational and really cool, just called older ladies.

16m 18s

Zoë Tucker

I don't know another way to put it. And they T you know, they show the little girl, they plant the seeds, they nurture them, they talk to the, the garden. They, they sort of whisper their hopes and dreams to the plants as they grow. And it's these, these three older ladies take the little girl all the way through the book, but at some point in autumn and winter, the grandmother dies and the other ladies begin the garden again with her. So it's that cycle of life through the seasons, but having these women around her,

16m 59s

JackieMarie Beyer

I did, I, I mean, I saw a few of the pictures online of some of the ladies, and I think that they, they definitely have that. Like, you can picture, you know, someone in your life, you know, even if they don't look anything like that. I mean, my grandmother certainly looked very different and, and didn't really garden at all. My mom's the gardener, but, but I think just that feeling of being around, you know, nurturing adults is a common thread that a lot of people

17m 29s

Zoë Tucker

Sure. Oh my goodness. I absolutely love that. And I think, I mean, it was, I was thinking about what they represent to me and they represent my, my mum wasn't the Gardner, but I think my experience of loss and grief there has kind of come into the book, but I have to, I have to give a shout out to my mother-in-law. Who's just amazing. She's 82. She looks a sprightly 70 she's really, she's really bright and intelligent. And she always takes such a fantastic interest in what we're doing and what our daughter's doing. And she always wants to learn from us, but at the same time, she's so generous with her knowledge and her life experience.

18m 16s

Zoë Tucker

And I think that's something that we can all benefit from that sharing of knowledge between the generations. And we're kind of excited by that hope. I hope that comes across quite well.

18m 27s

JackieMarie Beyer

Well, I think one of the interesting things on my podcast is that many of my guests have shared that their passion for gardening came from spending time in the garden with their grandparents. And I always remind listeners that if you are the grandparent or the parent trying to share with your child and your child is resisting, and they're like, I don't want to go in the garden. I, you know, I don't want to just like a lot of my guests who have grown up to become either like, you know, they grow almost all the food for their family, or they're a, now a market farmer, or even like me, my mom's like, I don't understand how you came out with a garden podcast. Cause I didn't want to have anything to do with the garden, but when I was a kid, but that it's just sharing that passion.

19m 8s

JackieMarie Beyer

And just always like, you know, and just the time spent with the child, you know, don't feel like it's a waste and don't get frustrated because the kids all like almost everybody, or a lot of my guests have said that that was where it started for them. And even though they like, you know, took 10 or 15 or 20 years away when they got back to it, it was because of spending time with a grandparent or, or a parent in the gardens, but a lot of grandparents, for sure.

19m 38s

Zoë Tucker

Yeah. I think that was really beautiful. And I know that, I mean, it's sounds a cheesy way of putting it, but there anything that we sort of sew into our children's lives, whether it's art or gardening or music, and they kind of take it up for a few years and then they drift away from it. It definitely does come back later in life. My stepdaughter is going to be 27 next week. And I've definitely felt that with her, when I met my husband, she was nine. And I feel like some of the things she did as a young girl are now she's really embracing those now as a, as a young woman, it's wonderful to see,

20m 16s

JackieMarie Beyer

Oh, that's something else we have in common. My stepdaughters were nine and 13, I think when Mike and I got married and now my grandkids are in their twenties. Oh, wow.

20m 25s

Zoë Tucker

That's wonderful. Oh, that's really exciting. I really, yeah. I think sharing, sharing between the generations is, is such a nice feeling. And I, I don't know if you have this with your children, but I think when you're doing something together, like gardening or being in nature together, and you're walking, you're able to talk about some of those tricky subjects. You know, like when you're not just sat across the dinner table, staring at each other, but you're actually doing something else in life. You're able to kind of navigate through some of life's challenges without it being such a big deal.

21m 5s

JackieMarie Beyer

And, and it's like, the garden is like one of the places that we can all come together and the grandkids love. Like I always send the pictures of like, when the curates are ready or like the peas are ready in the cause usually the, the sweet peas are, you know, ready first, the sugar snaps, they come for the 4th of July. And then when they can finally harvest the carrots in the fall and just something they always remember is being in grandpa's garden with him and, and those memories, I think will, you know, they'll cherish for

21m 38s

Zoë Tucker

Definitely. I still save up empty jam jars to give to my dad because he, they, one of my memories is definitely picking blackberries in the garden and black currents in the garden to make jam. He did all of it. I mean, my dad is a great cook and he obviously enjoyed his garden. And I think that's a definite, happy memory is picking, picking fruits and, and eating them half of them before you even get in the bowl and making something wonderful from it. And, you know, a couple of years ago, two years ago in the first lockdown, obviously pandemic lockdown, we rent up just when we were finally allowed out, we went to visit my mother-in-law and they have a, they do have a garden, which I'm deeply envious of.

22m 27s

Zoë Tucker

And at the end of the garden, they've created just a small raised bed where they grow some spinach shot potatoes. Right. Really kind of straightforward, simple vegetables, occasionally beans. And they said to me, would I like to dig potatoes? And I've never done that before in my life. It's like magic. Isn't it? When they come out to the ground, I was like, oh my goodness. It's like buried treasure when you just turn the soil and they just pop up. Oh, amazing. I look forward to having a garden like that of my own one day.

23m 4s

JackieMarie Beyer

Yeah. And you never, you never forget. Like I remember the very first time we did that, we were on vacation when we were kids up in Vermont. This teacher, friend of my moms had invited us up to come visit. And she, we got there late and she's like, oh, well, we'll have hamburgers. And we're going to go out in the back and we're going to pick, you know, we're going to dig up the CA the potatoes and the beats. And like, there was nothing I ever tasted as good as, like, I can smell it. Remember it you're 50, 50 years later, you know, those picking those vegetables out of the garden, just like you're describing. It's so true.

23m 39s

Zoë Tucker

I think that's possibly been the most satisfying part of growing things on the doorstep. I mean, we live in the city, we have a very, very limited space. And I think my friend Marie, just kind of giving me this opportunity and saying, just try it, you know? So what if it doesn't work? And the things that have really done well for us are really simple. They're very quick. They're crowd pleasers cut and grow. Lettuce is amazing. You put the seeds in, and literally four days later they've started. And within two weeks you can just cut a salad. And it was, I think that was just a revelation instead of buying bags of salad in the, in the supermarket.

24m 21s

Zoë Tucker

And then we managed to grow lots of different types of tomatoes. And we had a little pot for each different type. And I remember making a salad and we had and we made corn fritters. And my husband said, did we get all of this from the front step? And we did. And it was, it was such a tiny space, but being able to actually create a meal from what you've grown, albeit I can't create a meal every night, but it was really special. The ones that we did make,

24m 53s

JackieMarie Beyer

Do you grow any herbs in your pot?

24m 56s

Zoë Tucker

Well, funnily enough, I do. I've tried. I'm not great at Hertz. I have to say my brother-in-law is brilliant Gardner as well. He was saying to me this year, that's a really good thing for me to try because I really enjoy cooking. And it it's something that's every day that would really transform my cooking. So I've done quite well with the more Hardy, like a Rosemary type wooded herb. I'm really bad with the more delicate ones that the step, the area that we have in the summertime is really, if we have a good summer, it's a really, really hot and growing in pots, you know, it's just so easy for them to dry out.

25m 37s

Zoë Tucker

So I've struggled a little bit with that.

25m 40s

JackieMarie Beyer

I know I don't beat yourself up or anything. Cause one aromas are actually fairly hard to grow and I'm like jealous because Rosemary is one of the ones that I struggled with without a doubt, the most. And I'm laughing because my friend who is actually in London right now was here last summer. And like, I had potted a bunch of herbs spur and she was like, the day I finally brought them over to her house. She calls me and she's like a couple of days later and she's like, my Rosemary's dying. And like, I'm all worried, what am I doing wrong? And I'm like, you know, just sometimes plants just, I was like, my Rosemary's dead.

26m 21s

JackieMarie Beyer

Like I, part of her one the same day I potted meat. Like I went to the farmer's market and got his Folsom herbs. I was like mine too. Like just, it happens. And sometimes, you know, or the other thing that I've been like learning since I've had my podcast is like, I've always struggled to grow cilantro. And finally, after talking to enough of my guests, I figured out that part of the problem is Swan really only grows once. Like I'm expecting it to like, you know, I'm going to prove it. Like my beasel plant growing and cilantro doesn't do that. Like you get a harvest and you need to like do succession planning where you're constantly just putting new seeds in the ground. I'm not, it's not going to keep growing like by bees. And then

27m 0s

Zoë Tucker

It's really interesting. I did try a bit of that with, and I tried parsley and I tried to mix it in with my cotton grow lettuce. And I had same thing. I mean, cotton grow lettuce. It does kind of keep going, but you do need to kind of plant in cycles. So you put some in one week and then the next week you'll Chuck a few more, and this is my controlled gardening, but yeah, the postie didn't, it was, it was confused and difficult and didn't yeah, it didn't come back. I don't think it was a satisfying experience for me. The other thing I should say about my cut and grow lettuce this year, we had a very wet summer and which it did well, but we came home at one point and I've noticed on the leaves, on the underside of the leaves, there's tiny, tiny little dots everywhere.

27m 50s

Zoë Tucker

And I was like, oh, I wonder what those are. And we did it. We came home one day and honestly they just made caterpillars and the caterpillars then went into the cocoon and they were all around the front door and then they went into butterflies. So whilst I didn't get to enjoy my salad, I feel like I gave back to the environment in a different way by creating lots of butterflies and caterpillars.

28m 16s

JackieMarie Beyer

Ah, is that story in the book? I know, cause I'd probably after the book was written at the public, but wouldn't that, that could be booked too, cause that's such a great story. And just, and I think those are like so important lessons, because again, like I was seeing, like my friend was like, I've talked to several people that are like so devastated. And like even when I first started my podcast, I was like, I'm the organic eater. I can barely keep a Faisal plant alive, you know? And, and just, I've learned so much that I can keep quite a bit alive now. And there's herbs that I love and grow really well. And there's herbs that I just keep struggling with, but I keep trying and I go to the farmer's market and I buy a new one and I'm like, all right, this is going to grow.

29m 2s

JackieMarie Beyer

Or I go to that like, you know, produce section and plant it in the middle of winter. And I'm like, those are going to grow. But you know, the one thing about that is it might, you know, it might last longer than it in your fridge. And then you can always dry. Like even if it does die, you can dry it. You can take the dead Rosemary leaves and like put them in a drawer and then you'll have dried Rosemary, which this friend of mine and I were actually talking about how it takes a lot more fresh Bazell to get flavor. Like if you're flavoring a steward or super something dry Bazell anyway. So sometimes you're almost better off that way. Yeah.

29m 36s

Zoë Tucker

That's surgery. So here, I mean, Rosemead grows so easily here that despite the fact that if I do have a pot on the front step, that's great. But if I don't, all I need to do is walk around the block and I can find someone's. So there's big grow, like huge bushes in the front of the garden. Then you can just pinch a little sprinkle too, and it's fine for your roast dinner on the weekend.

29m 60s

JackieMarie Beyer

And it isn't very like, and your potatoes are in your meal. Like it just, I love the Tisa pressures married.

30m 8s

Zoë Tucker

I use time a lot as well. I feel like that's what I should grow. I use it a lot in my cooking and then soups and stews and things. So

30m 16s

JackieMarie Beyer

No time feels like a weed in my garden. It like all over the rocks and just in is everywhere time and oregano are two that spread out like crazy. I kind of do okay with Sage. Sometimes I had this one giant Sage plan and ever since it just finally died one year and I haven't quite gotten anything else to take off quite as big as it was. But, and then I have a pretty big tear gum plan, but everything else, as far as herbs go, I stroke a lavender. I can not keep lavender of life.

30m 48s

Zoë Tucker

I was just going to ask you about that. I, I husband loves lavender and we periodically go and buy 11 to Birch and I cannot keep it alive. But I think again, it's it doesn't like being in a pot. I think it actually likes to be in the ground and you must never ever let it dry out

31m 6s

JackieMarie Beyer

And see, my listeners are laughing cause they're like, cause they know like my biggest challenge is watering and that's one reason I struggle with pots because they do dry out faster than even deep beds to dry out faster than, you know, just like planting right in the ground. And that is something we have a shortage of water and then just me, like, I'm always like what I watered yesterday. My husband's always like you have a water every day. Somebody waits in the summer, you know?

31m 35s

Zoë Tucker

Yeah. I do remember my dad doing that in high summer. My dad would water in the morning before the sun got high. And then in the evening again, and I have to say in the first, so I had a really successful year, few years actually, but definitely the, again, the first lockdown was like a revelation because I wasn't traveling up and down to London for work. I was back, I was at home, working from home and our day to day just became quite small and local and we had time and we spent, we had an amazing summer here. I think that was a godsend for us in the UK where we can have very, very wet summers. We had, despite being in quite a long period of lockdown, we had this beautiful hot summer.

32m 19s

Zoë Tucker

So we actually spent all this time sitting on the front step, which meant that we watered the plants regularly. Cause we were sat looking at them. Then this year, my work has been really busy and I just haven't, I just haven't been as good at it, but I'm feeling quite inspired to have another go. So I think maybe I think tomatoes are definite for me and Herb's and the salad are, they're really good for pots. So I think that's my plan for this year.

32m 48s

JackieMarie Beyer

Salads are really getting containers. My question is like, what are your use to water? Like you have a hose right on the porch convenient. Or do you have to like fill up out a watering can or like what's your watering situation

32m 60s

Zoë Tucker

Picture? Can you picture a British milk bottle? Yeah. It's like, it's like a pint bottle. I'll probably use a milk bottle and just go back and forth to my kitchen over and over. I did have a washing can, but it, it got nicked, urban living. It got nicked and I left it on the front steps. So that's fair enough. But yeah, yes. Yeah. It got it. Yeah. Yes. It's stolen or just repurposed by someone else taken somewhere else to a new home, but yeah, a milk bottle. Oh, why worry? It's only a watering can it's okay.

33m 40s

Zoë Tucker

Yeah. So that's, it's, it's not really, I mean, we're talking a very small area. I'm sure some of your listeners will picture a Victorian terrorist house and you can Google Brighton, Victorian terrorists and you'll get these rows and rows of white houses are very pretty, but they're not very big, but I think, you know, that's one of the things that's been through good is learning that even in the smallest space you can grow something. I think that was really liberating. Even if you're just, you've just got a window windowsill that you can put something on, you can still grow some hubs.

34m 18s

JackieMarie Beyer

Yeah, for sure. And, and I think like they're the best things to grow because like I said, I'm the organic eater and cooker, you know, I cook a lot of food and, and there's nothing like cooking with fresh herbs and, or making like salads, like having, you know, cause it'll make like every single salad will have like a little bit of different depending on like if you cut a little more tear gone one day or a little more oregano the next day, like it can, it can really change the flavors of yourself. So I'm curious to know, like one of the questions I always ask is like, do you have a fever tool for planting and pots or anything that you

34m 57s

Zoë Tucker

No, but I tell you what I do need a cushion to kneel on when I'm doing it because you just don't concrete on the, you know, terracotta tiles outside. So definitely a comfy cushion and no, I don't have any special tools and pretty low maintenance on all of that. I wish I was better at, do you like a bamboo cane to help train my tomato plants? That's it really it's really low rent.

35m 28s

JackieMarie Beyer

I like that. Yeah. Is there anything else you want to talk about today that we haven't touched on?

35m 36s

Zoë Tucker

I think, I think this is good. I, you know, I hope that I hope it's been interesting for your listeners. It's been really lovely and yeah. I hope the book strikes a bit of hope and inspiration for people and gets that community spirit going

35m 54s

JackieMarie Beyer

No to have a website where do people get your book?

35m 58s

Zoë Tucker

Oh, so yes, you can get your, you can order the book from any good book seller book shop. My website is you can find me on Instagram, on Zoe Tucker design, which is cause I'm a designer and you'll find links to my website through that as well.

36m 20s

JackieMarie Beyer

Okay. Everybody get your copy of the garden we share and then make sure you leave a five star review on Amazon or wherever your favorite bookseller is. So other people will get it and share it because it's lovely. And you can buy it for someone for your favorite reader for like mother's day or earth day or their birthday, or it's just a beautiful book. And I know you're going to love it as much as I do. So thank you so much for sharing with us. Today's Zoe.

36m 48s

Zoë Tucker

Oh, thank you so much for having me. It's wonderful. And I look forward to hearing the podcast in the future. I'm going to be checking in here and what you're talking about and thanks for giving me some tips on my garden. My Tony God.

37m 1s

JackieMarie Beyer

Well, you're very welcome. And maybe who knows someday, I will actually make it across the pond and over to London and Brighton and we can meet in person and, and church, some garden, something or another together.

37m 15s

Zoë Tucker

So nice. Yes, please. If you do make it over, expect you to let me know. Okay.

37m 20s

JackieMarie Beyer

I will. For sure. Like I I've been telling my mom Charles doubting that's who it is. You need to go and do like a tour. Cause like who else did they interview? Pauline polling peers and the contented begin Peggy Brusso. And just like, I have like a whole list of gardeners I can come visit now. And I just, I've been, I've been like, I'm totally like this morning on my exercise bike. I watched this YouTube video of this woman. It's called Alison Paris that I just love and I'm dying to go back to Paris. And when I went last time, I was supposed to go to one gym because the people, my website provider is actually based in London and I was going to go meet him and some other friends and I didn't make it, but next time I go, I'm, I'm definitely gonna try harder.

38m 6s

JackieMarie Beyer

So

38m 8s

Zoë Tucker

I think that sounds great. You should definitely tying it for something like the Chelsea flower show, which is an annual garden show here. And it's absolutely stunning. And then the other thing I think you should look up, I have this book called the edible garden by Alice Fowler, which is a L Y S Fowler is F O w L E R. And it's really lovely because it's kind of a very relaxed style of gardening. And she, she talks about is perfect for me cause there's a little bit in it about growing in a small space, but she also talks about a more established garden and she has this style of gardening where she mixes the flowers and the vegetables and everything all in together.

38m 49s

Zoë Tucker

So it looks quite wild and quite free. I think you might like that. Check it out.

38m 55s

JackieMarie Beyer

All right. I will for sure. Okay. Everybody remember on Instagram at Zoe Tucker designs, Z O E T U C K E R D E S I G N. And her book is the garden share. Thank you so much. No, we have a great day. Thank

39m 12s

Zoë Tucker

You. Bye-bye

39m 14s

JackieMarie Beyer

Bye. Okay. I'm sure.

About the author, Jackie Marie

I'm an artist and educator. I live at the "Organic Oasis" with my husband Mike where we practice earth friendly techniques in our garden nestled in the mountains of Montana.